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Fact Check: Rock Engraving Of Mesopotamian Ruler Falsely Shared as 6000 Years Old Carving Of Shri Ram and Hanuman

Sanjeeb Phuyal is the Nepali Editor of Newschecker based in Kathmandu, Nepal. He brings over a decade of experience writing and editing news. In his previous stint, he worked as online editor for The Kathmandu Post. With the growth of social media platforms—and the ever-growing competition amongst media outlets to churn out breaking news, he feels that fact-checking every piece of information has become essential today than ever before.

Claim
6000 years old rock engrave of Hindu God Sri Ram and Hanuman Ji found in Silemania, Iraq.
Fact
Image carried in the viral video shows Mesopotamian art in Belula Pass, Iraq.

A video allegedly showing a “6000 years old rock engraving of Hindu God Sri Ram and Hanuman in Silemania, Iraq” is going viral on TikTok.

TikTok user @awareness963 posted a video showing a rock carving with text superimposed on it reading, “6000 years old Sri Ram and Hanuman Ji carving in Silemania, Iraq.” A devotion song (Bhajan) dedicated to Hindu lord Ram is played in the background. 

The video posted on January 8 has garnered 6191 likes, 248 users have shared it and 188 people have commented until the time of publishing this article. The archived version of the TikTok video can be seen here.
Newschecker found the claim to be misleading.

Fact Check /Verification

To check the authenticity of the claim made in the viral video, Newschecker took a key-frame from the viral video and ran a reverse search which threw up several articles carrying the image whose frames exactly matched the viral video.
On checking an article published on World History et cetera, we found that the image shown in the viral video is known as ‘Relief of Tardunni’ or ‘Belula Pass Rock Relief’.

According to the article, the overall scene and the style/shape of the inscriptions on the relief date the work back to the Akkadian period, circa 22nd century BCE.

The article has quoted Hashim Hama Abdullah, director of the Sulaymaniyah Museum, says that the inscriptions seemed to be added to the relief later on, not at the same time when the relief was made, and there are many readings of these inscriptions; the names of different kings/rulers appear, unfortunately. There is a theory that this represents a Gutian ruler. The most acceptable theory is that the name “Tar…dunni”, son of Ikki, who was a Lullubian king, prince, ruler, or high-ranking official, is the name of the depicted warrior. Did “Tar…dunni” document one of his victories against the Hurrians on this relief? Or, who was the victors and vanquished? Why, when, and where the battle occurred?

Further, taking a clue from the article, we conducted a search on YouTube and found a video of ‘Belula Rock Relief’ published on the YouTube channel named ‘Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin FRCP, FACP, FAHA’ on May 9, 2019.

According to the video description, Rock Relief depicts “Tar…dunni”, who is son of Ikki. He was a regional king, prince, ruler, or high-ranking official, circa 2100-2000 BCE.

Thus, our findings clearly show that the rock inscription shows a Mesopotamian engraving known as ‘Belula Pass Rock Relief’.

Conclusion

No, the viral video doesn’t show 6000 years old rock engraving of Hindu God Ram and Hanuman. The image carried in the viral video actually shows an inscription of Mesopotamian ruler and his captives.

Result: False

Sources
World History et cetra, April 14, 2015
Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin FRCP, FACP, FAHA/YouTube, May 9, 2019


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Sanjeeb Phuyal is the Nepali Editor of Newschecker based in Kathmandu, Nepal. He brings over a decade of experience writing and editing news. In his previous stint, he worked as online editor for The Kathmandu Post. With the growth of social media platforms—and the ever-growing competition amongst media outlets to churn out breaking news, he feels that fact-checking every piece of information has become essential today than ever before.

Sanjeeb Phuyal
Sanjeeb Phuyal is the Nepali Editor of Newschecker based in Kathmandu, Nepal. He brings over a decade of experience writing and editing news. In his previous stint, he worked as online editor for The Kathmandu Post. With the growth of social media platforms—and the ever-growing competition amongst media outlets to churn out breaking news, he feels that fact-checking every piece of information has become essential today than ever before.

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